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WALK AND TALK THERAPY       

The longest journey begins with a single step.

Patanjali

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WHAT IS WALK AND TALK THERAPY?

Walk and talk therapy is just what it sounds like: instead of meeting in an office, you and your therapist meet outdoors and walk together while the therapeutic processes unfold. This is not a new practice method. In fact it is a very ancient concept. Aristotle and Socrates famously walked during lectures. Sigmund Freud often walked with patients during the analysis process. Although it is unknown why this form of teaching and therapy fell out of fashion, it is finally seeing a

resurgence in popularity and utility. Not only do we have increasing evidence of the effectiveness of walking with your therapist, there are many practical reasons that this form of therapy may be right for you. Exercising, especially walking, provides well-established cardiovascular benefits and the incorporation of movement with the therapeutic conversation increases the integrative capacity of each therapy session. In other words, moving while talking makes short work of problem solving, gaining insight, and making positive changes in your life!

Two Dried Leaves
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NATURE AND NEUROSCIENCE

Image by David Vig

THE POWER OF MOVEMENT

Have you ever noticed how easily the conversation flows when you are walking with someone? The simple act of moving forward creates change in and of itself. By engaging with your therapist while walking outdoors, ideas and insights tend to flow more freely. Walk and talk enlists the power of bilateral movement artfully combined with evidence-based psychotherapy techniques such as Cognitive Behavioral Therapy or Solution-Focused Therapy to help you reach your personal goals! For more information on the benefits of Walk and Talk please visit the resources page.

WHO CAN BENEFIT FROM WALK AND TALK

Walk and Talk Therapy is highly effective in helping people manage  problems of daily living such as stress, burnout, marital and family problems, performance issues, body acceptance, chronic pain, among others. It can also serve as an adjunct or booster therapy for individuals with a current diagnosis who are goal oriented in their treatment or simply have trouble with the typical face-to-face, in-office therapy setting.  Please visit the FAQ page for commonly asked questions!

Jogging in Park
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